Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions About University Support

What will happen if I report an incident to the university?

By reporting the incident to the university, we can connect you to a number of support options available on campus including help with academic problems, class schedules, financial aid, housing arrangements, transportation, and assistance in receiving health and counseling services. You are NOT required to provide additional information about the incident or participate in a university investigation in order to receive services. Our primary goal is to help, and we will always respect your decision to share, or not share, any aspect of your situation with us.

If you report information to a university employee designated confidential, that employee does not have an obligation to report the information to the Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity. To provide accommodation(s) requested by the survivor, confidential employees may need to share limited information with those involved with implementing the accommodation(s).

When a required reporter receives information about an incident, the employee is required to share that information with Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity and the university has a responsibility to investigate based on the information provided and take action to prevent its reoccurrence.

If the person who harmed you is not affiliated with the University of Oregon, the university’s response to the report of an incident will be focused primarily on providing services and accommodations to the survivor and addressing any potential safety issues on campus.

Is there a way to keep the person who did this away from me?

Yes! You have several options for keeping this person from contacting you. If this person is another student, the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards can send them what is known as a “no-contact letter,” which instructs this person that they can no longer have any form of contact with you. If they choose to violate this letter, they may face sanctions through the university’s conduct system.

In addition, you can receive help from the court. Even without a formal report to law enforcement, students may be eligible for legal court orders that can provide a higher level of protection, which include restraining orders and stalking orders. Obtaining these orders from the court is free, and we can help explain the process and accompany you to get the orders if you would like that support.

If I tell the university what has happened to me, will my friends, family, professors, etc. find out?

No. Only a few specially trained individuals will ever know that you reported to the university and their primary goal will be to help provide support and services to you. Students 18 years or older are protected by FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act), which means that we cannot disclose information about your report to your family or friends without your written consent.

What if I live in the same residence hall or apartment as the person who hurt me?

You have the right to feel safe in your living situation. If you live in the same residence hall as the person who hurt you, we can help. We may be able to move this person out of your hall or out of housing entirely. If you choose, we can also move you to another room.

If you live off campus there are options for you as well, which may include legal protective orders and police actions. Call 541‑346‑7233 (SAFE) or contact law enforcement for more information on your off-campus options.

What if I have classes with the person who hurt me?

You have the right to feel safe in attending your classes, and we are here to help. If you share classes or any other university-affiliated activity with the person who hurt you, we may be able to remove that person. If you prefer, we can provide assistance in changing your schedule as well. These accommodations are provided with the highest level of confidentially possible.

Can I receive help through the university without having to tell them who hurt me?

Yes. A student is NOT required to provide additional information about the incident or participate in a university investigation in order to receive services. Our primary goal is to help the survivor, and we will respect the student’s decision to share, or not share, any aspect of the situation with us.

What if the person who hurt me is not affiliated with the university?

If the person who did this is not affiliated with the University of Oregon, the university’s response to the report of an incident will primarily be on providing services to the survivor. In rare circumstances, if we become aware that a community member poses a larger threat to the university community, we may pursue additional measures to ensure safety.

If I report to the university, will I be forced to press criminal charges or give information against the accused student in university conduct proceedings?

If you are over the age of 18 you have the right to choose if you want to report to law enforcement or the university. While the university does have a legal obligation to investigate, you have the right to not participate in the investigation or provide any additional information. In cases where the survivor chooses not to provide more information to the university’s investigation, it is unlikely that the investigation will continue. However, there are circumstances where the university has an obligation to proceed with conduct violation charges without the cooperation of the survivor in order to protect the safety of the campus community. The safety of the survivor is the highest priority of the university.

Can I report anonymously?

Yes. The anonymous reporting website can help you report anonymously.

This option allows you to report information about the incident without identifying yourself. Based solely on an anonymous report, however, neither the university nor the UO Police Department may be able to pursue action against the person who hurt you if the report does not contain any identifiable information. The report can help provide very vital information that can be used to identify perpetrators and patterns of their behavior(s). If you choose to pursue action against this person you have the option to report the incident to the university or law enforcement at a later date.

If you choose to report anonymously, we want to ensure that you are safe in your situation. We encourage you to seek safety planning from a confidential resource.

It is your right to report the incident anonymously to the university or law enforcement if you do not want the incident to be investigated. However, it is important for you to know that most employees of the university (including student employees and resident assistants) are required reporters. Required reporters are mandated by university policy to report to the administration any information they receive about sexual harassment, including sexual assault, dating or domestic violence, gender-based harassment and bullying, and stalking. Once the university receives this information, they are federally mandated to provide services to the survivor and look into the incident reported.

Are there confidential places on campus where I can receive help?

Yes, we have a 24-hour confidential hotline where you can speak with a specially trained therapist who can guide you through your options in getting help at 541‑346‑7233 (SAFE).

Additionally, the University Health Center and the University Counseling Center have confidential resources on campus where you can receive help and support without the university being informed of the incident. They are great resources to use if you know you would not like to report the incident or if you would like to talk over the options with a trained professional.

I don’t want to receive help on campus. Where can I go?

Students have the option of contacting outside community agencies for support, which do not have the same obligation as the university to report or investigate incidents.

Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS)
541-343-7277 (SASS)

SASS is a non-profit organization providing outreach, advocacy, and support to survivors of sexual violence and their partners, families, and friends throughout Eugene-Springfield and the rest of Lane County.

  • Their advocates listen, believe, support, accompany, offer information and referrals, and provide peer counseling to survivors of assault, past and present
  • They maintain a 24-hour crisis and support line and offer 24-hour advocacy for survivors of sexual assault and sexual abuse

Womenspace
541-485-6513

Womenspace is a non-profit organization that provides the following services to survivors of domestic or dating violence and stalking in Lane County:

  • Emergency shelter
  • 24-hour crisis line
  • Support groups
  • Transitional programs
  • Community education
  • Legal advocacy
  • Rural advocacy

Lane County Victim Services
541-682-4523

Lane County Victim Services utilizes volunteers assigned to the court advocacy unit, the protective order unit, and the family violence unit. The goal of the program is to provide comprehensive services to adult crime victims involved in the criminal justice system, whether or not they are involved with the prosecution of the offender.

Outside agencies do not have authority to independently arrange on-campus remediation such as on-campus housing changes, academic accommodations, assistance with financial aid, student employment, or other campus needs.

Frequently Asked Questions About Law Enforcement’s Response

What will happen if I report to law enforcement?

If you want to report to law enforcement, an officer will come and meet with you and take a report. Based on your wishes, they may start an investigation which could include talking with any witnesses. The police officers can also help plan for your safety and filing a report can help document the situation that can later be used if you decide to press charges.

If I tell law enforcement what happened, what will happen to the person who hurt me?

Reporting to law enforcement may initiate an investigation, arrest, and prosecution of the perpetrator. However, in many cases there is not enough evidence for the case to move forward. This does not mean that the incident did not occur or that is was not wrong or illegal. The nature of these crimes can sometimes make it difficult to hold people accountable through the criminal justice system. In general, law enforcement and the district attorney will not pursue charges without the survivor’s cooperation.

Is there a way to keep the person who did this away from me?

Yes. Even without a formal report to a police officer, you may be eligible for legal court orders, including restraining orders and stalking orders that can provide a higher level of protection. Obtaining these orders from the court is free, and we can help explain the process and accompany you to get the orders.

If you decide to press charges, the person who hurt you may be arrested, prosecuted, and sentenced for their crime depending on the circumstances. 

If I report to the police, will the university find out?

It depends. If you report to the University of Oregon Police Department, the university will be informed of the incident, and we will reach out to you to provide resources. The university has a memorandum of understanding with the Eugene Police department—if a student reports to the Eugene Police department the university is often notified about the incident. At that time the university will reach out to the student. If the incident is reported elsewhere, it is unlikely that the university would be informed.

Can I report anonymously?

Yes. The anonymous reporting website can help you report anonymously.

This option allows you to report information about the incident without identifying yourself; based solely on an anonymous report, neither the university nor the UO Police department may be able to pursue action against the person who hurt you if the report does not contain any identifiable information. The report can help provide very vital information that can be used to identify perpetrators and patterns of their behavior(s). If you choose to pursue action against this person you have the option to report the incident to the university or law enforcement at a later date.

If you choose to report anonymously, we want to ensure that you are safe in your situation. We encourage you to seek safety planning from a confidential resource.

It is your right to report the incident anonymously to the university or law enforcement if you do not want the incident to be investigated. However, it is important for you to know that most employees of the university (including student employees and resident assistants) are required reporters. Required reporters are mandated by university policy to report to the administration any information they receive about sexual harassment, including sexual assault, dating or domestic violence, gender-based harassment and bullying, and stalking. Once the university receives this information, they are federally mandated to provide services to the survivor and look into the incident reported.

Frequently Asked Questions About Getting Help From Community Agencies

Can these agencies help me with problems on campus?

Outside agencies do not have authority to independently arrange on-campus remediation, such as on-campus housing changes, academic accommodations, assistance with financial aid, student employment, or other campus needs.

If I seek help from these agencies now, can I report to the UO or law enforcement later?

Yes. You always have the right to report at a later date. Keep in mind that if you choose to pursue action against this person, some of the physical evidence may be gone if too much time has elapsed.

Even if I do not wish to seek services or help from the university, do I have the option to report the incident anonymously?

Yes. The anonymous reporting website can help you report anonymously.

This option allows you to report information about the incident without identifying yourself; based solely on an anonymous report, neither the university nor the UO Police department may be able to pursue action against the person who hurt you if the report does not contain any identifiable information. The report can help provide very vital information that can be used to identify perpetrators and patterns of their behavior(s). If you choose to pursue action against this person you have the option to report the incident to the university or law enforcement at a later date.

If you choose to report anonymously, we want to ensure you are safe in your situation. We encourage you to seek safety planning from a confidential resource.

It is your right to report the incident anonymously to the university or law enforcement if you do not want the incident to be investigated. However, it is important for you to know that most employees of the university (including student employees and resident assistants) are required reporters. Required reporters are mandated by university policy to report to the administration any information they receive about sexual harassment, including sexual assault, dating or domestic violence, gender-based harassment and bullying, and stalking. Once the university receives this information, they are federally mandated to provide services to the survivor and look into the incident reported.